The Government Closest to the People 

Founded in 1925, the Nassau County Village Officials Association (NCVOA) is a not-for-profit organization comprising and representing all of Nassau County’s 64 villages with 450,000 residents. 

It was created for the purpose of encouraging and stimulating cooperation among its member villages for their mutual benefit and welfare. 

While the NCVOA is not a municipal organization, it strives to meet the highest ethical standards and is sensitive to the legal and ethical restriction of its member villages.  To that end, the NCVOA is dedicated to providing village officials with

  • a forum for exchanging ideas and experiences in the administration of their municipal duties;
  • developing educational programs and conferences to assist village officials with implementing their civic responsibilities;
  • studying and discussing various activities and actions that will benefit the public safety, health and welfare of our member villages governed by these officials; and
  • investigating and discussing the most efficient means and methods of village government. 

 

Definition of a Village

As defined in Google/Wikipedia:

In  New York State, a village is an incorporated area that differs from a city in that a village is within the jurisdiction of one or more towns, whereas a city is independent of a town. Villages thus have less autonomy than cities.

A village is usually, but not always, within a single town. A village is a clearly defined municipality that provides the services closest to the residents, such as garbage collection, street and highway maintenance, street lighting and building codes. Some villages provide their own police and other optional services. Those municipal services not provided by the village are provided by the town or towns containing the village. As of the 2000 census, there are 553 villages in New York.

There is no limit to the population of a village in New York; Hempstead, the largest village in the state, has 55,000 residents, making it more populous than some of the state's cities. However, villages in the state may not exceed five square miles (13 km²) in area. Present law requires a minimum of 500 residents to incorporate as a village.

As We See It:

Villages were created to provide efficient services under local control and the watchful eye of its residents. The notion that the majority of villages were created solely to control zoning, block development, and promulgate a NIMBY attitude is not true.

The longevity among our villages formed during the more rural days of Nassau County is not uncommon. the reason people look to move to incorporated villages is simple. They want and get the services which is municipal governments responsibility.  In fact, village residential property has a long tradition of being desired, at a premium, over other area homes.

 

 


 

The Views of a Past Governor

State of New York
Executive Chambers
Albany, NY
 

Thomas E. Dewey
Governor
June 19, 1942
 

Mr. Harry J. Wellebil, Secretary
Nassau County Village Officials Association
375 Sunrise Highway,
Lynbrook, NY
 

Dear Mr. Wellebil

I am happy to greet the members of the Nassau County Village Officials Association through its report and seventeen years of service to Nassau County.

Your Association makes an invaluable contribution to good government in the State of New York. It is too easily forgotten that no government is no better than its roots in every locality. The officials closest to the ideas and needs of the people are the officials of the villages, towns and counties. They are the foundation of free government. Without the knowledge and the work that they are able to provide, a free republic would not be able to exist.

So, today, near the end of the long trend to remove all power from the people to a centralized government, I want to greet you on stout service during these difficult years. You have never lost sight of the fundamentals of government. May you continue to grow ever stronger in your service to the people.

With warm personal regards, I am

        Sincerely yours, 

       Governor Thomas E. Dewey